Picture Credit: “strolling” by E>mar is licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

A new study, the findings for which were published in the March 24–31, 2020, issue of JAMA, offers strong support for the life-extending effects of a daily walk.

Want to lower your odds of dying of heart disease? If you don’t exercise regularly, taking an extra 4,000 steps per day may help, even if you walk at a leisurely pace, the new study finds.

Most people typically get around 3,000 to 4,000 steps per day doing any things such as doing household chores, checking their mailbox, or going grocery shopping. But if you regularly walk another 4,000 steps a day to reach a total of about 8,000 steps per day, there’s a dramatic difference in whether you live or die over the next decade.

“This study supports what we know about the marked benefit of achieving about 8,000 steps per day,” says Dr. Edward Phillips, assistant professor of physical medicine and rehabilitation at Harvard Medical School. Most people typically get around 3,000 to 4,000 steps per day without doing any intentional exercise, he notes. That includes things such as doing household chores, checking your mailbox, or going grocery shopping, for example. “But if you regularly walk another 4,000 steps a day to reach a total of about 8,000 steps per day, there’s a dramatic difference in whether you live or die over the next decade,” says Dr. Phillips.

Caution: No content on here, regardless of date, should ever be used as a substitute for direct medical advice from your doctor or other qualified clinician/medical practitioner.

Read the full article on Harvard Health Publishing here.

Martin Pollins
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